Tuesday, September 27, 2016

The Entrepreneur Blues

I'm sure most of you who are in business, whether you're a writer or sell a product(s), you have had this thought - I wish I could afford to hire an assistant.

I know I have. There are so many side marketing tasks you must perform that it can become overwhelming. First of all, I am not a computer person. I want to concentrate on my writing, not chasing after reviewers or building advertisements for Facebook. And there are a lot of other things I'm supposed to be doing to build my business.

But I have no other choice.

Then low and behold, you find out there are people out in the world that can actually help you - but there's a drawback - it costs money. For me, it's a no brainer. Either I spend the money, or I don't get it done. It's that simple.

I do not have the expertise to figure out, not to mention the time, how to perform a lot of these marketing skills. I admit it. Plus, life's too short. However, this is where organization comes in. And I've preached a lot about organizing your time.

So, it's time to break out the old calendar. Time to list what I need to do. And, hopefully, check these items off one by one. 

If you want to be successful as an indie author, and even as a traditional one, you have to market your books, otherwise they will never be noticed. Therefore, today I will be writing, and working on marketing. 

What has helped you gain more customers/followers? Are you putting in the time to get noticed? Have you broke down and hired someone to do it for you?



I would love to hear your ideas and even procrastination moments through your journey - either as a writer, or as a business owner.

I hope everyone has a great week and keep in touch!

Love, Lisa


Thursday, September 15, 2016

Prioritize Your Time

My, how the weeks fly by. I find myself wondering where the time goes, not only in my day to day stuff, but also with my social media marketing stuff. I tend to lose track especially if I get caught up on Facebook, or any other social site.

Lately I've been putting more time in my latest WIP (work in progress). I've got so much work to do that using up my time scrolling through Facebook is losing valuable minutes. So I've chosen to back off the endless hours of dog videos and political talking points. It's amazing how much more I can accomplish.

Choosing to limit your time on your social sites is the best way to organize, not only your work, but your life. I think one of the best things I ever purchased is my smart phone. I can jump on any site and spend a couple of minutes, then get on with other things. I'm still engaged, but on a much smaller time table.

I've been working on building ads for Fable and my website. I'm almost ready to send out my first one. I've also been trying to update my website with pictures and contact letters for my newsletter. In fact, the most valuable way to reach your readers is through emails and I've refocused on doing just that.

Writing on this blog is another social marketing tool. It's nice to be able to reach people with a click of a button on my Fanpage. 

But the most important way to connect: getting my series written and publishing it so my readers can enjoy my hard work. I mean, isn't that what it's all about? My writing?! 


I am going to be offering, not only a free book - Fable - but if you leave me a review on Amazon you can read Fated for free. Refocusing on what's is vital, which is reviews, takes me to a whole other level. I want to get my books out there for readers to enjoy and hopefully can't wait for the next one. It's truly what I strive for.

And I want to build my fanbase so reorganizing how I market is key to reaching my goals.

What do you do to reach your fans? Do you find yourself spending too much time on Facebook? Leave me a comment and let me know your thoughts or secrets. I would love to discuss it with you.

Taking time out to do for you and to continue doing what you do best is what's important. Think about this before you spend all your time on social media. Everything needs balance.



Love, Lisa


Thursday, September 8, 2016

Creative Writing Skills Blunder

Finally getting back on track with life. It's been overwhelming lately, but things are slowing down now to a crawl - which I prefer. I decided maybe it's time to get back to discussing some creative writing skills and maybe some marketing hints on this blog. It's never to late to touch on the basics.

Today I thought one issue that comes up a lot in critiques, at least with my critique partner and I anyway, is redundancy. And not just in descriptions, but also in using the same word(s) a lot within the same scene/chapter.

You don't even realize that you're doing it, which is where having a critique partner comes in handy. I thank God everyday for Robin. I'm also blessed with Heather and Michael too. Without them my books would not sound, or read, as crisp as they do. It's absolutely worth seeking out a great team!

Now onto the subject at hand: Redundancy.

One lesson that most writers are taught is: You Can't Edit Your Own Work.

It's a hard one to swallow since we tend to think our writing is amazing, no matter how long we've been at it. Even a lot of the veteran writers need edits. At least that's what I've seen with all the reading I do. But letting go of that ego and constantly working on bettering your craft will take you much farther in this business as apposed to just publishing anything - like your rough draft. Which I have often thought when reading some of the new writers out there. 

Life is a constant learning curve, and that's okay.

For some reason when we are typing away on the keys, really focusing in on a scene we want to get down on paper, we tend to use a lot of the same words. That's fine as long as you realize that you have to go back and revise your work. We like to over use "was" "things" "looked" and a whole host of other junk words. And we can find ourselves choosing a word that we use for describing the same action over and over. Lately I was pointed to the fact that I use "heading" a lot. You know, instead of, walking, strolling, anything other than "heading". 

I didn't know I was doing it, and even though I read over my work and attempted to revise, I didn't see I my mistake. It could be any word like the one I used above. And it's not hard to find yourself repeating - we all do it.

The other redundancy we do is trying to point out an important event of issue, we tend to point it out several other times within our dialog or internal thoughts of our characters. I think the reader has gotten the point, especially if you've said it twice already. A third or more times gets monotonous.  

But at the same time, when the subject of that issue or event comes up again several chapters later, you do need to remind the reader. Otherwise they will become confused about it and find themselves looking back to see what you're talking about. That's just as obnoxious. 

The same goes for past events in your previous series. Sometimes you need to remind the reader about the event so they understand what the characters are facing. This can also become redundant. You don't have to do a "tell all", just key occurrences to juggle their memories. If they haven't read your previous books, then they will have to go back and read them to understand the full extent. 

Redundancy is more than a typical issue, it is a constant one. As we become more aware of our craft and the skills we need to focus our efforts on, this one will hopefully fall to a rarity. Remember it's our readers that are the most important if you want to gain fans, and possibly a huge following.

I hope this helps those of you who are new to writing, and maybe some of you who have written a few books. What do you do to prevent redundancy? Do you have great critique partners, or do you even rely on one?

I would love to hear your thoughts on this subject so leave me a comment!


Have a great week/weekend all!

Love, Lisa